Alameda Naval Air Museum

Our Mission

  • To provide the opportunity to learn, share and experience the history of the Naval Air Station.
  • To collect, document and preserve those items that made aviation history and those associated with NAS Alameda.
  • To provide students of all ages the ability and chance to understand and explore the world of aviation.
  • To provide the public with information and research on Naval Aviation in the Pacific.

Museum Overview

The historic legacy of the Alameda Naval Air Station will be preserved at the Alameda Naval Air Museum located in the former Air Terminal Building #77 at Alameda Point. Our museum features archival materials, photographs and stories of the war workers of World War II up to the eventual closing of the base in 1997.

This project was made possible by a grant for building upgrades from the Economic Development Agency and the city of Alameda. To date, some $750,000 worth of improvements have been made to Building #77 to meet all code requirements of the City of Alameda.

Volunteers established the Alameda Naval Air Museum as an educational community center to tell the story of it's beginnings in support of the Pacific Fleet in World War II and it's subsequent decades of service to the nation during Korea, Vietnam and Desert Storm.

Visitors can read historic newspapers, such as those published at Pearl Harbor, and have an opportunity to re-live the past. That is what history is all about. We are interested in acquiring and preserving documents that illustrate and celebrate the people and stories of the World War II years. Our collection includes artifacts, photographs, aircraft models, programs, guide books, flyers, documents, safety gear, medals, uniforms, badges and awards.

The purpose of our museum is to preserve for the benefit and inspiration of future generations and to leave a historic legacy.

Society and industry were changed forever by the sweeping impacts of the World War II build-up. For the first time, men, women and minorities worked together side by side. Services such as health insurance and child care were initiated in industry to improve worker's health, productivity and retention. Labor and government worked together to provide to the fleet overhauled aircraft and engines achieving unheard of production records.

People moved here from all over the country in unprecedented numbers to seek industrial production jobs. This changed rural and urban America forever. The Air Station had 45,000 personnel at its peak in 1945 when the city of Alameda had only 25,000 residents. The base covered one-third of the island of Alameda.

The museum volunteers host many visits of school children and other local and national groups so they can learn about Naval Aviation history and the valuable contributions made by the many generations of workers during the last half of the 20th Century. More than 250 skilled trades came together at NAS Alameda to create lasting records of top workmanship and professionalism.